05 May 2013

Lear and Liam Win Over The Leprechauns

Liam the lowly leprechaun sought
just one thing, to fashion a fiddle
that played good music that couldn't be bought.
The teachers, the wood, the strings to diddle

made it hard to learn craft that didn't come easy,
meanwhile, leprechauns scoffed and ridiculed.
He made one and another as his friends teased
but songs squeaked horribly, quite constrictalooed.

On March seventeen lightening felled oldest oak.
Liam gathered wood with magic hoped inside
sure this would sound sweet or he's broke.
Bent he worked day after day when, woe betide,

the fiddle was done in time for summer's grand festival
but no one knew 'til the moment arrived for competition.
Liam took the stage while jeers rang out and it felt like a crestival
he climbed to raise his bow. But play he did with no need for contrition

for sky lightening and ancient oakness combined
to produce such music that all called: sublime!


Written in response to Kerry O'Connor over at Imaginary Gardens with Real Toads who wrote about Edward Lear whose birthday is in May and asked us to let some nonsense happen. I love his made up words so thought I'd give it a try.

20 comments:

  1. constrictulooed!

    Now there's an amazing word to read on a Sunday. You have told a wonderful tale, all the while crafting your lines and rhymes with a poet's skill.

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    1. This was a fun challenge, Kerry. Thanks also for the great info on Edward Lear.

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  2. What fun! I enjoyed reading it and listening to the sublime music in my head :-)

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    1. Poetry I can attempt- music not so much.

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  3. Replies
    1. Liam's been around in my brain for a while but this gave me a direction to take. I enjoyed it.

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  4. How could any Irish girl not like this?

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    1. Not any that I know. Are you one, too?

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  5. On, lovely, Mary.
    I'm sure "ancient oakness" was the secret ingredient. How lucky for Liam that Lear was near.
    We have an adorable grandson named Liam, and I love the name.
    K

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    1. I love the name as well. We get to visit Ireland frequently since we live in Italy so things Irish are on my mind.

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  6. Love this tale. It reads so easily. I so struggle with rhyme.

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    1. I did as well but it gave me the chance to invent made up words if I couldn't think of others.

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  7. Lovely small Irish tale here! Good for Liam!

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    1. I'm thinking of writing a longer story of this- it will be fun to try anyway.

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  8. Very creative word invention, Mary, with a spirit of fun.

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    1. Made me appreciate Edward Lear all the more.

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  9. Hooray for " sky lightening and ancient oakness " (LOVE the name Liam)

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    1. They're magical elements for sure.

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