18 September 2012

What Role We Have




What role we grands should take fills mind and heart
these days, 'sides love them well, the roots of roots n' wings,
love fierce, connect to all who ancest'red them, bring
complete the circle with them the purpose, the art,
entire, achieved, concluded, free drawn, writ large,
us left breathless at the specter except to sing
our songs for them and attend to theirs gathering
pieces to swell the family trove with their charms.
It's not about them at all, of course, but us,
death's incursion that lies beneath all else
and stands in contrast to their upward slant,
throws us back to what we do with such
lives as we've been given in gen'rous grace, not false
striving to garner praise but pouring hearts 'till spent.



This poem actually was inspired by the dVerse Poets post of September 13 about sonnets. It was a generous and meaty article by Gay Reiser Cannon with lots of information about various kinds and structure of sonnets and splendid examples. I've been working on this since and finished it yesterday. I'm amazed that others wrote theirs so quickly. I post it tonight for Open Link Night at dVerse Poets Pub hosted by Claudia, an inspirational poet in her own right.
(photo taken on my recent trip to Ireland)

24 comments:

  1. A touching combination of lyric and narrative, they are so fortunate to have you as you thoughtfully examine your role. I was struck especially by death's incursion, a beautiful sonnet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah yes, death's fierce incursion. Thank you for your kind words.

      Delete
  2. My goodness! I am very impressed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, Linda! I'm enjoying earning more about poetry.

      Delete
  3. Beautiful! There is an Irish feel to this, and I can't explain why.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This poem percolated while I was there and is probably informed by my experiences. What struck me this time was the inclusion of all ages at traditional music sessions. The young ones are honored for their playing and are integrated into whatever music is happening, at least in the early hours of the evening. I also came across a rich, gorgeous book of Irish Poetry and saw how it's integrated into children's education at every grade level.

      Delete
  4. Interesting to see that you wrote a poem, as I did, about the grandparent role.. I love the idea of not false striving to garner grace but 'pouring hearts 'till spent.' I commend you on doing it in sonnet form!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Mary. I noticed that as well and enjoyed your tribute to the sheer joy of moving.

      Delete
  5. very nice...you worked this really well...and it is interesting as well to find that role and where you fit...i think it is important in the lives of kids to have multiple generations in their life....it teaches them so much....but also we learn from them....smiles...great job on the sonnet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the learning goes both ways. The dVerse Poets Pub has opened new worlds to me and I'm grateful!

      Delete
  6. Indeed..as days unfold into another season, death seems close and the list of "yet to be done" weighs on days that pass quicker while one moves a bit slower and time, the betrayer, never waits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true. It's a dawning realization for me and surprised me when it came to mind first when I wanted to change mood at line 9. I'm just sitting with it for now.

      Delete
  7. Well done sonnet on wonderful theme. Good work! I loved my grandmothers dearly - I haven't yet had chance! k.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a uniquely wonderful role that I love deeply.

      Delete
  8. Nicely done and grandmothers are the best.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True for me and I hope for my grandchildren.

      Delete
  9. I wouldn't know a sonnet if it made me breakfast. But I do know I like this, and relate copletely. Well done, Mary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You make me laugh! Actually, that would be a great first line for a sonnet! It's a fun role, isn't it?

      Delete
  10. what a beautiful sonnet...having a grandmother is such a blessing for kids...mine love theirs dearly and learn so much about life from them from a different perspective

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One of life's richest blessings- for both generations.

      Delete
  11. Beautiful Ireland, lovely photo, Mary.

    Pouring hearts 'til spent, and singing our songs. A skillful sonnet with depth of feeling. Yes it's the contrast, isn't it: our near-spent life (well not so near I hope) and their spanking new one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I share that hope. Still… the contrast exists, brings things into bold relief and makes them sweet. But aren't our lives fuller for it all?

      Delete
  12. Nicely done! I enjoyed the feel of the old-style language and format, combined with content which I know to be immediate. I think I'll go read some old sonnets now, and see whether the sentiments strike me as more contemporary than they used to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been enjoying my reintroduction at this new stage of life. I'm appreciating them so much more now. I've more experience to link it to.

      Delete

Let's chat.